The Unedited
Free space for free expression in English & Italian
(Un)Edited by Carlo Pelanda
Managed by F.Brunelli e L.Borgiani

03 TH OF DECEMBER 2009

Day and night the engineer had to work on his new identity. Italy was still, at least nominally, a European nation, he had no reason to behave like the subject of an African regime. Yet, if he had to find a job, he couldn't boast his EU citizenship. Employee who could have required too high wages had scarce chance to obtain a job on the on-line market. You could work at home from Lahore as from Milan, but with 300 Euro you could afford the life of a Maharaja in the suburbs of any Indian city. Provided you had no need for imported European goods. The price were nonetheless increasing when professional job was required, and indeed the Indian market was creating an army of well bred and paid experts. Italy was falling behind the developing world.

The first contacts recorded a complete defeat. Nobody wanted to thrust a technician who couldn't provide references. But how could references be collected for a fake identity? Perhaps the very same references could have supported the opening of a bank account, perhaps abroad, that could help the engineer to survive the unbeatable bureaucracy of that kind of Democratic Republic. The police could have certainly closed the controls on already rich entrepreneurs, but who could have cared of an outcast living on the terrace of the company for which he was to presume to work. Yet, ethics was involved as well. But why should the engineer take care to contribute to the institutions that were so violently suppressing his hope for a brilliant career.

It resulted quite easy to acquire the picture of an unknown subject of the Pakistani Republic and merge the traits of his dark complexion with the eyes and lips of our eccentric hero. Since he was to be sure that in successful circumstances no unexpected hindrance should deprive him of the treasure he could have accumulated in some clandestine vault of a fiscal paradise. Any software could have proved his true identity through iris recognition. They could indeed have used it in the company downstairs, to track employees presence in the buildings. Some privacy issues had been risen. Fingerprints were quite easy to be unequivocally linked to the effective owner. Moreover nobody could forget his eyes and fingerprints at home, as they usually did with an ID card. Nobody thought about a simple RFID device that could be installed in any object of daily usage and whose presence could have been detected without the usual inconvenience to extract the card from the wallet, and the wallet from the jeans, the jacket or the bag.

The engineer was not in the habit to break the law, and didn't find that the inconveniences produced by the outrageous conditions he could be implied with could provide him some excuse to misbehave. Social networks on the web were a powerful instrument to forge the profile of a brand new software engineer, living in the suburban area of Chennai, having graduated at the local University, that shares anyway quite an high reputation, and looking for a placement. He could also give some hints that he was already working daytime for an established software house, but that was indeed the truth and many employers seeking for underpaid professionals would have certainly appreciated such a condition.

Spurred by the initial success, he acquired the braveness to join a professional network, with some evidence of his own past career. He had to mix facts and information, making his poor working experience compatible with the one of a country than on expertise has made a vital bet for the future. On the contrary, the Italian regime, not already established, but ready to take the power, had erected his power on the principle that everybody is equal. Therefore making a distinction based on culture and skills acquired with a formal training would have resulted into a severe discrimination. According to the etiquette of the Democratic Republic. Perhaps they really believed that academical level education for technician didn't matter and most of the chief members of the Party were quite relieved by the scores of high, but expensive, profiles fleeing abroad.

 

 


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